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Looking at the above picture of the Handy Hooker wood working clamp and tool hanger, I hear Comic Book Guy in the back of my head saying “Worst. Tool Storage Idea. Ever.” Normally if I come across a tool that I can’t say anything positive about, I just don’t post it, but every once in a while something so atrocious comes along I have to share it. The Handy Hooker wood working clamp and tool hanger crosses the line.

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If it wasn’t for the one shot of all the tools clustered together and hanging from the straps, I might have passed the website right by, discounting the Handy Hooker as yet another typical As-Seen-On-TV type product. But the sloppy fashion in which the clamps are arranged left me twitching.

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Horrible name aside, the concept behind the Handy Hooker is that you wrap the looped strap around the object and hang it by a stainless steel snap hook on one of three rings on the baseplate mounted to the wall. OK, so far so good, but hanging multiple items on a strap and multiple straps on each ring just looks bad. 

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However, if you really wanted to, you can put up to 120 lbs. of tools on the system.

I guess it’s supposed to be a redeeming quality that it’s made in the USA — I’d almost hoped it was imported. For $28 you get a triple ring base plate, three 21″ straps, three 15″ straps, and 6 stainless steel screws and anchors.

Tool Storage [Handy Hooker]

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14 Responses to Worst. Tool Storage Idea. Ever.

  1. Jonathan Peterson says:

    $30 for 6 nylon straps and hook eyes?

  2. Mike47 says:

    Majorly stupid idea for storing clamps, unless you intend never to use them.

  3. ambush27 says:

    or look at them, but then you might as well chuck ’em in a closet or sell them.

  4. Patrick says:

    Check the website – if a handy hook can’t hang your tools, the exact same product can hang a bag of equipment or maybe a kayak….thirty dollars for an eye hook and a rope. What a rip-off.

  5. MeasureOnceCutTwice says:

    Ya know, it may be worth while. 120 Lbs should be plenty to support that neighborhood pesky kid who’s always bugging you – keep him out of the way of the saw!

    (Actually, I like it when my kids & others “help” me in the shop. Plenty of time to do some work safe enough for them to be there, and do the serious stuff after they get bored & leave)

  6. ttamnoswad says:

    “Normally if I come across a tool that I can’t say anything positive about, I just don’t post it”……….I wish this wasn’t the standard practice these days.

    I propose that we all should be more constructively critical in all things and try to make things better by pointing out failures and praising successes.

    Perhaps if people were embarrassed by their stupid ideas, they would learn not to make such horrible products.

    For some reason the Pontiac Aztec comes to mind……..If an excucutive would have just stood up and said no effing way to building that as a Pontiac……..maybe that brand would still be around today.

  7. Cameron Watt says:

    The worst way to store clamps: Clamping them between two joists in a basement shop. Here’s how it works: You put up the first clamp and snug it up. Then you put up the second one beside it and and snug it up….and by the time you get a few up, you’ve pulled the joists enough that the first one is no longer tight and falls on you.

    Ahem-so I’m told.

  8. matt says:

    I usually clamp them on the same joist…..

  9. aaron says:

    ttamnoswad is my hero for the day. thank you.

  10. Wheels17 says:

    @Cameron, I agree with Matt. Great place to store them, since I’m 6’5″ and it’s an easy reach… Also,a thin strip glued and tacked to the screw side of the joist at the bottom keeps them from falling if the screw loosens. A couple of more turns to open over the strip, but not a big deal

  11. Benjamen Johnson says:

    @ttamnoswad:

    While I agree with you in theory, I think practically it won’t have the effect you desire. By giving bad products any press you’re increasing their visibility. It still amazes me that when I Google for a tool, if Toolmonger has covered it, it’s in top four links more times than it’s not.

    Like it or not, people react poorly to criticism, not just the person being criticized but other people hearing the criticism. In the long run they tend to project the negative feelings on the criticizer not the person or thing being criticized. Whether you like it or not you probably do it subconsciously all the time. I fear it would hurt the readership of the blog. (Being from a scientific and engineering background I hate when psychology gets in the way of the facts)

    I do promise that next time I buy a crappy product I’ll be sure to tell you about it.

  12. Benjamen Johnson says:

    Let me clarify one thing. I was talking specifically about posting bad tools.

    I criticize good tools I post when I feel they deserve it, even though inevitably in the comments somebody misunderstands the criticism and think I’m panning the product.

  13. Jerry says:

    It is interesting to note how often something (tools and other stuff) that gets bad reviews ends up the source of a disagreement between various factions. It’s kind of like the 2 sides of every HF tool. Those who claim to have found some very useful items and those who say that everything that comes from HF is just junk. Some of fall into the middle ground of deciding if the HF stuff will suit our particular need and agreeing that a lot of the stuff is junk.
    Worse than determining that our own opinion is the best one are those folks who do no personal research. I suppose though, that is good for all those late night infomercial offerings. “Wow! Look what that thing can do. Send me a dozen. I’ll give ’em as gifts.” Snugee, Billy Bass, etc.

  14. Shopmonger says:

    Yeah i agree way to expensive for toolmongers…. we love to build ourselves….hardware store and some time and poof we can all have these for a fraction of the cost…. they would be great for hanging camping equipment, or items not often used…..like maybe that cast iron tree stand we only use 1 month out of the year… or maybe those lawn chairs when they are stored away because of the snow on the ground…….

    ShopMonger

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