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If you think stainless steel is only good for kitchen appliances and Doc Brown’s home-brew time machine, take a look at this 1936 Ford Deluxe.  Allegheny Ludlum Steel Division and the Ford Motor Company built this and a handful of others just like it as an experiment, and to raise awareness that stainless steel had many applications in the automotive world.

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Weight really wasn’t a problem or even a concern, as most vehicles back then were built like battleships anyway, and the gleaming bodywork was both quite sturdy and well-received everywhere it went.  The site says they’re still around and in use at special functions to this day, which we find completely sweet.

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Now, throw some mags on it, stuff in a modern 350 HP Ford truck motor and a decent stereo, and you’ll be good to go.

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1936 Stainless Steel Ford [Allegheny Ludlum]

 

8 Responses to It’s Just Cool: ’36 Stainless Ford

  1. forler98022 says:

    wow cool but i bet its is really heavy.i was trying to think of the name two the car from back to the future movies.

  2. Erich says:

    Next up: a giant stainless steel top hat, and a gargantuan shoe.

    Life-size Monopoly will rule!

  3. ChrisW says:

    The DeLorean DMC-12 was featured in the films.

  4. Sean O'Hara says:

    Life-size Monopoly… that’s awesome. I should have thought of that.

  5. forlerm says:

    thanks chris that was bothering me. also i wonder how long it wood take to buff something like that i am guessing at least 6 hours

  6. Jerry says:

    The tag line said it all – “It’s just cool”! Talk about a head-turner – especially on a bright, sunny day!

  7. ambush says:

    Stainless steel is also good for knives, the problems with stainless steel are that there are many different qualities(like steel I suppose, but far more vague and complicated), and its around 8 times the price…

  8. jim says:

    Why would the weight be significantly different? I would assume the panels were formed on the same tools as the production cars – they probably had to use about the same thickness sheetmetal. T302 stainless density is 7.86 g/cc, rolled steel is ~7.85, and only the shell was stainless. The frame etc. was normal. I bet the weight would be almost the same.

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